International Development - Audio

A group of sovereign countries came together out of the ashes of World War II and created the United Nations – the formal name given by the allied countries who won World War II – to solve collective global problems. The United Nations built upon hard lessons learned from the failure of the League of Nations. Senator Arthur Vandenberg was one of the key architects of the United Nations as we know it.

 

In 1945, seeking bipartisan support for rebuilding the world, President Truman called upon Senator Vandenberg to join him as a member of the U.S. Delegation to the United Nations Conference in San Francisco. Senator Vandenberg worked across party lines with President Truman and played a pivotal role in standing up the United Nations Charter, which assured that the U.S. held veto power in the Security Council. Senator Vandenberg returned to the Senate and ensured that the United Nations Charter received overwhelming support. Thanks in part to his efforts, the United Nations remains the preeminent international problem-solving body in the world today.

 

Although there are existing criticisms surrounding the United Nations, a functioning United Nations remains in the U.S. interest. One of the most critical roles the United Nations plays is addressing global problems and burden sharing the costs of security, development, and other public goods. CSIS would like to use this opportunity to identify areas of bipartisan agreement over the U.S. role in the United Nations.

 

Please join us for a public armchair discussion with Governor Bill Richardson and Catherine Bertini which will reflect on the progress made at the United Nations since its formation and will examine how the United States can partner with the United Nations for its economic and national security interests.

 
This is the second event in a CSIS series focused on “Building Bipartisan Solutions for Foreign Policy Issues: The Arthur Vandenberg Legacy Initiative.” The first event was held in March 2019 focused on “The Case for U.S. Foreign Assistance” where CSIS convened Senator Tom Daschle and Senator Norm Coleman. CSIS has also released a video on the legacy of Arthur Vandenberg.  

 
This event is made possible through generous support from the Meijer Foundation.